Theatre review: Bad Jews at The Fugard Theatre

Glen Biderman-Pam (Liam) and Lara Lipschitz as Daphna argue, with Donna Cormack-Thompson as Melody looking on, in The Fugard's BAD JEWS. Photo credit: Daniel Rutland Manners

Liam (Glen Biderman-Pam) and Daphna (Lara Lipschitz), with Melody (Donna Cormack-Thompson) keeping her distance.      Photo credit: Daniel Rutland Manners

The joy of family is that you have people in your life that you would not necessarily choose yourself.

The downfall:  you have people in your life you would not have had despite your best efforts to shake them.

Bad Jews plays off in bachelor apartment with a view of the Hudson River that, even though said view is just from the bathroom, is quite a palace by New York City standards. However, it quickly becomes claustrophobic as outspoken Jew, and defensive person in general, Daphna (Lara Lipschitz) stays over with her cousin Jonah (Oliver Booth) after their grandfather’s funeral.

There’s a culture clash of sorts when Jonah’s secular brother and Daphna’s least favourite cousin Liam (Glen Biderman-Pam) shows up with his Christian girlfriend Melody (Donna Cormack-Thomson). As grandchildren of a Holocaust survivor, the cousins all have very different ideas about honouring, or forgetting, this legacy.

Bad Jews is (VERY) loud and in your face. In fact, when I saw the show during its first run at the Fugard last year I felt quite rattled. From my second row seat it felt like I was being screamed at for an hour and a half. From the 5th row seat it felt much safer this time around.

The dialogue has the fast-passed, high pitch of a well-oiled Gilmore Girls rant, stuffed with a lifetime worth of comebacks that are usually only thought of days later, stewed in a pressure cooker of resentment.

Set designer Saul Radomsky has created a set that seems so solid they might as well have built a real New York City apartment on stage. With real SMEG appliances and textured wallpaper, the stage is every bit as desirable as the characters gushing about it implied.

The pure force of personalities in Bad Jews makes for unorthodox comedic and dramatic moments. It’s like being wacked over the head by an entitled millennial with a witty, hard, truth stick.

If you’re in Cape Town for some local flavour you can also make a hard right in the Fugard foyer for the return of the musical District Six – Kanala by David Kramer.

Bad Jews is on at the Fugard Theatre until 14 January

Theatre review: The Father 

Brent Palmer (Pierre), Marius Weyers (Andre) and Anthea Thompson (Anne) Photo credit: Daniel Rutland Manners

Brent Palmer (Pierre), Marius Weyers (Andre) and Anthea Thompson (Anne)
Photo credit: Daniel Rutland Manners

In the opening scene of The Father the audience drops in on a conversation between a father and his daughter. Judging by the tears in Anne’s eyes it is clear that this is not the first time they have had this particular conversation. His tears, in turn, express his ras-le-bol. A French term with no literal English translation, ras-le-bol is used to express annoyance or frustration: although some words in Florian Zeller’s Le Père might have been slightly tweaked in Christopher Hampton’s translation, the raw emotion is not lost.

Marius Weyers (Andre) stars alongside Anthea Thompson (Anne) in The Father at the Fugard Theatre. The play gives the audience a unique view of life through the eyes of a man with dementia, and his daughter’s balancing act of taking care of him and being with her partner Pierre (Brent Palmer). The cast is rounded off with Amy Louise Wilson (Laura the caregiver) and Emily Child (Woman) and Nicholas Pauling as Man.

Having grown up watching Marius Weyers on television it was quite an honour seeing him on stage. One notable series he starred in was Song vir Katryn were he played a scene-stealing role as a man with advanced Alzheimer’s. With Andre, Weyers gets to really let loose, by not going that… well… loose at all. He keeps the character tight, authentic.

This approach is true to the heart of the play. The Father does not rely on big reveals and dramatic twists to move along the narrative. It is a highly visual production. With frosted glass sliding panels, the set changes dynamically within seconds, almost as fast as the actors switch roles. At curtain call the stage looked so full with the whole cast of six that, having been completely drawn into Andre’s mindset, I genuinely wondered “Who are you people?”.

Anthea Thomson (Anne) Photo credit: Daniel Rutland Manners

Anthea Thomson (Anne)
Photo credit: Daniel Rutland Manners

Up until Wednesday evening I was not a fan of Anthea Thompson, simply because her brand of comedy is not my cup of tea. Her drama on the other hand is superb.  Consider me converted. Thompson brings a regal quality to the character of Anne, refusing to be pitied.  One can’t help but be in her corner.

Birrie Le Roux’s costume design is so sleek the cast won’t be able to walk on the street without being harassed by a ‘street style’ blogger. Except for Andre’s sloppy red robe of course.  This robe and Laura’s red Tony sneakers are the only pops of colour in an otherwise monochrome palette, bookending the cast’s attire in a sense, echoing that Andre is in the winter of his life while the young Laura is in the spring of hers.

Despite dealing with a very dark subject matter, The Father does not leave its audience feeling drained. Maybe a bit nostalgic, but mostly more educated on a human condition that befalls many.

The Father runs at The Fugard Studio until 3 December 2016.

This review was featured on WhatsoninCapeTown.com

Theatre review: Hedwig and the Angry Inch

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Brendan van Rhyn dreamed of becoming a pediatrician.  I found it very hard to see myself, in let’s call it the darkest timeline, as his adoring audience of one, grateful that he cured my spawn of the flu in 13 days opposed to the regulation 14. Instead we were both in our highest heels, me without kids, and van Rhyn as Cathy Specific at the launch of Gate69. The Cape Town production of John Cameron Mitchell’s Hedwig and the Angry Inch almost became a sideshow to the splendor of Cape Town’s newest theatre.

Gate69 is plush and purple with Warhol-style pop art pieces and Cathy Specific-adorned furniture. Let’s just say no one will come off lightly making a drinking game out of seeing the premier flight attendant’s face at Gate69.  What starts subtly with the drag artist’s face on a few chairs in the bar area, explodes into a million of Cathy’s knowing smiles splashed on the wallpaper as you walk up the stairs, only to be greeted by the lady herself (Brendan van Rhyn) with a familiarity that makes you want to believe you are cousins.

Inside, the tables are packed tight and piled high with mezze platter delights and seasonal fruit. The waitresses – dressed in revealing PanAm air stewardess-style outfits (‘sexy’, but classy rather than crass) – plied us with warm bread all evening, reminiscent of a time when it was still fabulous to fly.

Hedwig (Paul du Toit) is unapologetic about having parked her trailer on Gate69’s prime real estate, the stage, and along with Yitzhak (Genna Galloway) she spends the next hour breaking it in, or rather bending it to her will.

Hedwig and the Angry Inch could be described as the lovechild of a down-and-dirty glam rock musical and a telenovela script that was rejected for being too realistic. Yet, as melodramatic as an East German genderqueer who survived the botched sex change operation needed in order to marry a man and escape the Berlin Wall only to be dumped in America may sound, it is relatable in a bizarre kind of way. Well the way Hedwig told it I could not help but believe it.

The audience feels Hedwig’s pain when we overhear the voice of her former lover – her ‘invention’ – thunder from

the Cape Town Stadium and not mention her name, not even to credit her for all the hit songs he ran off with.  With little acclaim for her work Hedwig jealously guards the dim spotlight, mostly from her far more talented and long resentful husband, Yitzhak.  Callously introduced by Hedwig as her ‘Boy Friday’, Yitzhak  is brilliantly played by Genna Galloway who, as it happens, is even more talented than du Toit.

The repeated mention of Cape Town stadium is just one of the many localisations that nonchalantly roll off Hedwig’s sharp tongue. I particularly enjoyed the dig at Patricia Lewis’ hair extensions, a classic if ever there was one.  She also occasionally broke the fourth wall to pick on the crowd and particularly on Cathy Specific and her ‘skinny stewardesses’.

Most Cape Town audiences will remember Paul du Toit from his extensive stint as Brad (440 performances in South Africa) opposite Brendan van Rhyn’s Frank-N-Furter in The Rocky Horror Show. Caked with glittering blue eye shadow du Toit looks much more comfortable in Hedwig’s skin. The red gash on his knee – presumably a rug-burn though Hedwig would have a more suggestive explanation – is evidence of his dedication to the role.  He is currently also on the South African film circuit as a corrupt brute of a police officer in SA’s official entry to the 2017 Oscars, Noem My Skollie, though the ultra-masculine character fell flat in my mind after experiencing Hedwig just two days earlier.

I have seen the band Van Coke Kartel in a venue with 20 people and open air venues where one has to fight for a place to stand, and they always played with the same energy. This is the same feeling that I got from Hedwig and Yitzhak. They ‘played’ to a stadium packed with fans pushing get a spot in the front instead of a crowd with assigned seats.  Behind Hedwig’s’ back Yitzhak rocked the hardest, careful to stay out of his line of vision and inadvertently solidly into that of a polite(ish) theatre crowd now itching to mosh in front of the stage.

Hedwig and the Angry Inch runs at at Gate69, Cape Town until 27 November 2016.

A version of this review was featured on WhatsoninCapeTown.com

Mini Theatre Review: Little Shop of Horrors

Alan Committie with Audrey II

Alan Committie with Audrey II

From our Theatre on the Bay balcony cheap seats we felt like voyagers spying on our neighbours across the street through a slightly pulled back curtain. It is an ideal vantage point to witness as the comings and goings of the little flower shop on the dodgy side of New York takes a turn from the mundane to the extraordinary. With the birth of Audrey II, homicidal avocado like Venus fly trap, Mr Mushnik’s flailing flower shop is transformed into the rock musical, Little Shop of Horrors. The scale of everything in this Pieter Torien produced musical is stupendous. From the size of the ever growing Audrey II puppet (“Feed me Seymour!”) to multiple immaculately fitted costume changes and the deep pool of talented performers such as Alan Committie (Seymour Krelborn) and Michael Richard (Mr Mushnik).

Candice van Litsenborgh and Alan Committie in Little Shop of Horros

Candice van Litsenborgh and Alan Committie in Little Shop of Horros

As impressive as the puppetry of Audrey II might be, the person you can never take your eyes off is its namesake Audrey I played by Candice van Litsenborgh. Van Litsenborgh no longer has the Understudy Blues* as she shines as Audrey, acting and singing everyone, including the combined powers of the doo-wop trio, under the flower shop counter. In the hands of another actress the character of Audrey can easily be completely pathetic and annoying, but with her high pitched Frenchie-from-Grease voice von L injects the character with a lethal dose of comedy and heart.

The Little Shop of Horrors has unfortunately come to the end of its Cape Town run (for now anyway, nothing like public demand to sway Pieter Torien into bring the show back to the Mother City, nudge nudge), and will be moving to the Pieter Toerien Main Theatre at Montecasino, 12 June – 9 August 2015.

This write-up is a little short (and late) to be useful as a review so I’ll rather call it an open letter** to Pieter Torien and Theatre on the Bay to say thank you for a putting on a smashing production.

* A seasoned understudy Candice van Litsenborgh rocked in her one woman show last year, Understudy Blues. Click here to read more. ** I actually consider open letters rather douchy but I probably can’t be an opinionated South African without writing at least one.

Little Shop of Horrors

The delightful doo-wop trio – Dionne Song, Chantal Herman and Lelo Ramasimong

The Fugard Theatre: The dawn of a new VIP

The Fugard Theatre Kit Kat Club Performances

(Left) Photo credit: Claire Taylor (Right) Photo credit: Claire Baillie

The concept of “VIP” has been so overused and bastardised that it has lost all meaning, and don’t get me started on “exclusive”. The Fugard Theatre’s Golden Ticket Event added meaning to these concepts again.

When they opened sales for Cabaret early-bird tickets a year ago they “hid” 50 golden tickets in the tickets for the special event. Details of this event remained sketchy until the very end, not that anything could have prepared us for the night we had.Kit Kat Club Antics

The eve before Freedom Day, a fleet of white stretch limousines lined the street outside The Fugard. While limos aren’t really that fabulous this side of the millennium, for the few hours that we hopped over to the unjaded other side, and it was spectacular. Through the tinted windows we could hardly see where we were going, and even when we entered a building that seemed borderline derelict, I still had no idea.

It was the Sideshow, kitted out to resemble the Kit Kat Club. The round tables were set with heavy glass– and silverware with a lone vintage musical instrument as a centrepiece. A working instrument as it turned out when a musician 2 tables over trumpeted a tune with their centrepiece.

Kit Kat Club Food

(Top left) Photo credit: Jenna Robinson Child (Top right) Between the steak and fish options most on my table opted for the “grass-fed beef fillet”. (Bottom left) The Chicken liver parfait and pistachio nut terrine entrée (Bottom right) Photo credit: Fugard Facebook page

Now please excuse me while I gush a bit like the theatre nerd that I am. We were seated next Dominque Maher (Columbia) and Emile Doubell (the usher that screamed “Oh you naughty man”) from The Rocky Horror Show amongst other performers. It was illuminating seeing performers’ reaction to a show, so much more enthusiastic and encouraging, obviously the way they want to be for cheered themselves.

The entertainment kicked off with the first number from Cabaret, Willkommen. My favourite was a dazzling mashup of Money and Lord’s Royals by Charl-Johan Lingenfelder (Emcee) and Claire Taylor (Sally Bowles). The band was not quite as beautiful as the stage production, though I recon a Big Band clad in white blazers would prefer the term handsome anyway. The real beauty was a lovely trapeze artist in the Kit Kat Klub uniform of nude undergarments that took to the air above us.

Kit Kat Club Photos

Using the hashtag #fugardcabaret, guest could send their snaps directly to a Brand Rocket machine to print a keepsake. My first goal was to create Cabaret-Inception.

Mingling with the cast was a pleasure as they kept in character and were always 2 seconds away from striking a pose. Pulane Rampoana (who plays the snarling Texas) made the biggest impression when she slipped out of her snarling character of Texas, and was warm and friendly – taking a few ladies for a twirl between the tables.

The Fugard Theatre’s Kit Kat Klub was like Disneyland for theatre freaks; a divine decadence. Maybe the best things in life are free – and VIP!

Cabaret is currently showing at The Fugard Theatre,  Tuesdays to Saturdays from R100-R280.

* Initially I thought it was way to early for another Cabaret production in Cape Town, as there was one about 3 years ago. The Fugard Theatre’s production, however, is darker and closer to the subject matter. While I never got around to writing a review, my sentiments were summed up by a conversion I eavesdropped while waiting for a taxi outside the Kit Kat Klub: “I don’t care if we don’t have any money, you have to see it. Even if I wait outside in the car for you.”

My Rocky write up: The Horror on Caledon Street

Fiëstas 2015: Everyone’s a winner – no really, they are!

The Fiëstas honours Afrikaans theatre in a fashion only kykNET can pull off:  absolutely uitspattig! The entrance of the Artscape was adorned with their signature blue carpet with colourful stilt walkers mixing with the local thearatti. 11030845_1083198358375429_8814251627001236077_n

Inside, helpers dressed in a vibrant cleaned-up version of steampunk – cleanpunk if you will – assisted with registration between selfies. It was an evening marked by bubbles; Du Toitskloof bubbly flowing generously and the entertainment was from a cellist in a life-sized bubble.

The fifth annual Fiëstas was hosted by Frank Opperman who had the audience in stitches with his dad jokes and a few throwbacks to his Orkney Snork Nie character that made him famous in the 90s.

Head of kykNET, Karen Meiring, hailed all the nominees as winners, adding merit to this clichéd phrased by adding that all nominees received artwork by the acclaimed South African artist Diane Victor.

Emo Adams was one of the big winners of the evening picking up 2 Fiëstas for Finding Emo (Beste prestasie in ‘n musiekgedrewe produksie and Beste musiekproduksie). After a season of American award shows with over the top speeches and false modestly, the genuineness of Afrikaans theatre professionals was endearing. Adams humbly dedicated his award to all the laaities (boys) in Mitchell’s Plain, the firefighters of Cape Town and Zane Adams. 10428587_10153107179489731_5484608955146705414_n

The Fiëstas truly brought the Artscape Theatre alive with live extracts from a few productions. Dogma was the most powerful with a suburban inspired scene of da Vinci’s Last Supper. The production by Christiaan Olwagen was honoured with 2 Fiëstas, Best Actress (Rolanda Marais) and Beste nuwe Afrikaanse opvoering.

Best Actor winner Albert Pretorius had proved his worth when he played opposite Sandra Prinsloo in an emotional extract of Die Seemeeu directly after winning the award. In fact he collected his award in costume.

Aardklop was crowned the ultimate winner of the evening scooping up the award for most popular festival and best production Bloed en Rose.

Fiëstas 2015 Winners

Gewildste fees: Aardklop
Beste aanbieding: Bloed en Rose (Aardklop)
Beste regisseur: Marthinus Basson – Bloed en Rose (Aardklop)
Beste aktrise: Rolanda Marais – Dogma & Die Seemeeu (KKNK & Aardklop)
Beste akteur: Albert Pretorius – Die Seemeeu & Playland (Aardklop & Suidoosterfees)
Beste vroulike byspeler: Lee-Ann van Rooi – Rondomskrik (KKNK)
Beste manlike byspeler: Stian Bam – Bloed en Rose (Aardklop)
Blou Stoel: Saartjie Botha vir die vertaling en verwerking van Die Rolbalspeler en Die Seemeeu
Beste opkomende kunstenaar: Richard September – Rondomskrik (KKNK)
Teaterontwerp: Jaco Bouwer – Poskantoor & Samsa-masjien/ (Aardklop & KKNK)
Beste prestasie in ‘n musiekgedrewe produksie: Emo Adams – Finding Emo
Beste solo-vertoning: Frank Opperman – Die klaagliedere van ds Tienie Benade
Beste prestasie in visuele kuns: Gerhard Marx – The Garden at Night (Aardklop)
Beste prestasie in klassieke musiek: Braam du Toit – Poskantoor (Aardklop) (komponis)
Beste musiekproduksie: – Emo Adams – Finding Emo
Beste nuwe Afrikaanse opvoering: – Christiaan Olwagen – Dogma (KKNK)

Lewensbydrae vir Teater: Marius Weyers
Lewensbydrae vir Teater en Woordkuns: Prof. Adam Small
Lewensbydrae vir Teater en Woordkuns: Wilma Stockenström
Lewensbydrae vir Musiek en Woordkuns: Philip de Vos

Fiëstas 2015 Wenners

FiestaWenners

Photo credit: Fiëstas Facebook page

Gewildste fees: Aardklop
Beste aanbieding: Bloed en Rose (Aardklop)
Beste regisseur: Marthinus Basson – Bloed en Rose (Aardklop)
Beste aktrise: Rolanda Marais – Dogma & Die Seemeeu (KKNK & Aardklop)
Beste akteur: Albert Pretorius – Die Seemeeu & Playland (Aardklop & Suidoosterfees)
Beste vroulike byspeler: Lee-Ann van Rooi – Rondomskrik (KKNK)
Beste manlike byspeler: Stian Bam – Bloed en Rose (Aardklop)
Blou Stoel: Saartjie Botha vir die vertaling en verwerking van Die Rolbalspeler en Die Seemeeu
Beste opkomende kunstenaar: Richard September – Rondomskrik (KKNK)
Teaterontwerp: Jaco Bouwer – Poskantoor & Samsa-masjien/ (Aardklop & KKNK)
Beste prestasie in ‘n musiekgedrewe produksie: Emo Adams – Finding Emo
Beste solo-vertoning: Frank Opperman – Die klaagliedere van ds Tienie Benade
Beste prestasie in visuele kuns: Gerhard Marx – The Garden at Night (Aardklop)
Beste prestasie in klassieke musiek: Braam du Toit – Poskantoor (Aardklop) (komponis)
Beste musiekproduksie: – Emo Adams – Finding Emo
Beste nuwe Afrikaanse opvoering: – Christiaan Olwagen – Dogma (KKNK)

Lewensbydrae vir Teater: Marius Weyers
Lewensbydrae vir Teater en Woordkuns: Prof. Adam Small
Lewensbydrae vir Teater en Woordkuns: Wilma Stockenström
Lewensbydrae vir Musiek en Woordkuns: Philip de Vos

Read more: Fiëstas 2015 – Everyone’s a winner – no really, they are!

Theatre Review: Robert Fridjhon’s Wild

If you Googled “Wild” hoping to read about Reese Witherspoon’s new Oscar bait film, I have to apologise by making you land on this blog. I have to concede some SEO voodoo might have pulled you here. But it’s in your best interest to stay for there’s another wild tale you really shouldn’t miss, Robert Fridjhon’s one man show Wild at Theatre on the Bay.  Wild

Wild is a mashup of How I Met Your Mother, Defending the Caveman and The Lion King condensed to 80 minutes and directed by Alan Committee. The narrative bounces back and forth punctuated by a phrase the audience grows to know very well, “Let me start again”.

Through many stop/starts the crazy tale, the kind one usually only hears at 2am in a bar, starts to unfold. Fridjhon is an Animal. He is also a self-confessed asshole and completely trashed in a strip club on a Friday afternoon. He has to save his relationship with Safe Suburban Nicky over dinner that evening, but first he has to be the Animal at the staff party at a strip club, have an intimate altercation with a stuffed lioness trophy and gain a new perspective on his life.

Fridjhon methodically paints the set with words, sculpting a dingy strip club into a complete lion enclosure from thin air. The audience leans forward as Ruby the lion stalks him through the long grass. They feel the compressed air on their skins as his little Scottish mother deflates the pool.

A minor but spectacular case of “theatre inception” occurs with throwbacks to Defending the Caveman, a role director Alan Committee has reprised for many seasons on the very same stage.

Animal

I am an Animal!

At the core of any good wild story is the element of truth, that hint of reality that makes the impossible seem plausible. Wild is based on Fridjhon’s experience of working at an animal sanctuary, and his genuine love wildlife is evident in all his elaborate anthropomorphic animal characterisations, all of which add depth to an already strong performance.

With Wild, Robert Fridjohn introduces a playfully intelligent brand of humour to the stage. It truly delivers on its tagline, “It’s a comedy that will sink its teeth into you.”

So if gossip reaches you of your significant other’s Wild night at Theatre on the Bay any time between now and the end of January you have every right to be furious. Watching great theatre without you?! Very few relationships can survive betrayal that deep.

Catch Wild’s limited run at Theatre on the Bay until 31 January 2015. Ten percent of Robert Fridjohn’s earnings from the play will be donated to the Drakenstein Lion Sanctuary in Paarl.

A version of this review was featured on WhatsoninCapeTown.com

Theatre Review: WhatWhat

WhatWhat is comedian Rob van Vuurnen’s ode to a phrase that can be “used to mean practically anything, from the indescribable to the unknowable to everything in between.” He takes advantage of this ambiguity working through a hoard of miscellaneous topics such as the horribleness of Aussies, anal sex, Nkandla (he won’t be a South African comedian without touching on this one), his super dog Bella, adoption, France and a secret Apartheid era gay language. WhatWhatIt takes a village to put together a one-man show, the 2013 Standard Bank Silver Ovation award winning WhatWhat owes a lot of its success to director Tara Notcutt, Gary Thomas (score), Siv Ngesi (producer) and choreography by Cleo Notcutt.

Highlights include a dramatic reading of a love letter that you might recognise as Taylor Swift’s “We Are Never Ever Getting Back Together”, and a prediction that it won’t be zombies beating down our doors during the looming apocalypse, but rather art critic trolls.

But Rob van Vuuren is more than just a comedian and white boy with dance moves, he is a messer of minds. Once he firmly places the audience in safe “you’re at a comedy show, laughs up ahead” frame of mind, he follows it up with the story of his grandmother passing away and how it affected him. Cue wide eyed audience, what what the f? Maybe it was a device to keep the audience from a falling laugh-track state and actually listening to the content of his jokes. Or an intensely strange set up for a joke he made in passing at the end of the show. Most likely he, along with Notcutt, is just messing with us all.

The age restriction is 13, but only if you can handle at least one awkward question from a 13+ year old, then it’s a lovely show to take your teens to this holiday season. Otherwise best wait for his new film with Jon Savage, Stone Cold Jane Austen which will be out early next year.

WhatWhat is sharp, silly, it’s stand-up with feeling.

Have your mind messed with by Rob van Vuuren from 1 December until 17 January 2014 at the Baxter Golden Arrow Studio.

Theatre review: …miskien

What gives a play the staying power to run for 5 years? Beyond the entertainment value, it’s to make the audience feel something. A feeling that will linger longer than a Carly Jepson earworm. On a stage littered with crunched up balls of paper, …miskien does just that.

miskien…miskien (Afrikaans for maybe) has a universal message told through two authentic South African characters. Two clock watchers (Albert Pretorius and Gideon Lombard) going through the motions of life, biding time until the next happy hour. Over Windhoek and Amstel they talk a big talk but the real conversation lies in the gaps.

The production is in English with a sprinkling of Afrikaans for emphasis and was written by the cast and director Tara Notcutt.

Pretorius, who won the New Icon award at the Silwerkermfees Awards last month, is absolutely brilliant. After seeing his emotional monologue in the film adaptation of Balbesit, where the camera was so zoomed in close enough to see his pores, I did not think it was possible to experience him more vulnerable. In …miskien he might as well have been naked.

…miskien is a production for true theatre lovers. There is a lot to chew on. Not that the play is pretentious, far front it, one merely needs to be in that mind set to take it all in and appreciate the elegant story telling.

Forget physical comedy, miskien is physical drama. The real story is told through glances, loaded physical contact and crashing to the floor.

…miskien runs at the Baxter Golden Arrow Studio from 2 to 27 September at 20:15. Tickets to Baxter Mondays cost R100, which includes a light meal. Tickets on Tuesdays are R120 for 2 tickets. Tickets to the 100th performance on 25 September tickets cost R145. Student tickets cost R65. All other tickets cost R120.