Silwerskermfees 2016: The short and the long of it

Next week Silwerskermfees will once again commandeers the Table Bay Hotel to screen for the best local feature films and 13 commissioned short films from 24 – 27 August 2016.

Here’s a few of the films I’m most excited about:

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Tess

Tess is about a sex worker who gets pregnant, how she got to that point and more importantly, what she’s going to do about it now. The film features a diverse cast that paints a true picture of South Africa.

I came across the film poster for Tess on Instagram and even though the name and the image was dramatically different to the novel, I immediately knew it was based on Tracey Farren’s Whiplash. I rcan not remember all the details of the book, but I do remember a feeling which is how, despite having just looked at a million pics of stranger’s lunch on Instagram, I identified the essence of the novel on Christia Visser’s (the eponymous star ofTess) face.

With: Christia Visser, Nse Ikpe-Etim, Brendon Daniels, Lee-Ann van Rooi, Quanita Adams and Greg Kriek.

13988116_318327588506951_587711829203814384_oNoem my Skollie: Elke roeping het ’n prys

Just last week South African rap-rave group Die Antwoord accused the makers of the blockbuster Suicide Squad for ripping off their look. Twitter in turn was quick to call out Die Antwoord for appropriating the gangster culture of the Cape flats.

Now forget everything you know about the above mentioned mess.

Set in the 60s Noem my Skollie looks at the real life experiences of the people living on the Cape Flats and joining a gang. Noem my Skollie is the directorial debut of Daryne Joshua and is based on the life of scriptwriter John W. Fredericks. Joshua who was born in raised on the Cape Flats made a point to cast actors similar backgrounds of the characters.

With: DJ Mouton, Austin Rose, Tarryn Wyngaard, Christian Bennett, Gershwin Mias, Oscar Peterson, Abdu Adams, Peter Butler, Charlton George, Jill ­Levenberg en Denise Newman.

Promising short films…

Die-Bok-Poster-723x1024Die Bok

A bitter pregnant women fights to protect her rose garden against a goat while her marriage is deteriorating.

Philip van Zyl is the director and writer of Die Bok. He is a film-maker from Pretoria with a love for truly South African stories with a strong human element.

Beloofde-Land-Poster-729x1024Beloofde Land

Lodewyk Mouton is the naive ruler of the dictatorship Anskroepolis. When a group of socialist rebels arrives at his manor house and threatens to topple him, Lood is confronted with the reality of his bubble-existence and the misery of his people.

Mia Cilliers is a writer and director of Cape Town with a background in documentary films, web series and reality television. She obtained a master’s degree in documentary arts from the University of Cape Town. She is the author and director of Beloofde Land.

Spoorloos-Poster-727x1024Spoor(loos)

If we could just disappear.

Marisa Drummond is a famous film and theatre actress and director of Spoor(loos). She made her directorial debut in the new kykNET soap Getroud met Rugby. The author of the short film is the PANSA-winning author Jannes Erasmus, making his short film debut.

Click here to snag the last few tickets to Silwerkermfees 2016.

 

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Trash Cabaret: Where normal people are the freaks

St Fox

St Fox

Trash Cabaret’s Carnival of Dreams was the most body positive event I’ve been to in a long time. People of all shapes and sizes were dancing, singing, swinging through the air (one from her ponytail), making the jocks wish they played oversized brass instruments in high schoo­l, singing Spider Pig and playing with fire (hoola hoops).

Trash Cabaret is “a multi-cultural circus cabaret extravaganza”. Dancers from different burlesque troupes pealed and revealed side by side and the house band played as one. Along with the band Master of ceremonies Riaan Smit (the sexy raspy voice behind Crimson House and one of the organisers of the event) was the lynchpin keeping the flow between all the different acts. With few exceptions such as the excellent Nameless Dance Crew, who used an eclectic mix of Rihanna*, Drake and other treffers, the music was live.

The Red Baroness

The Red Baroness

Not all the acts worked but it really didn’t matter because the pumped up house band, a fusion of The Nomadic Orchestra, Ann Jangle and Crimson House, provided constant stream of fun with their stage antics.

In jest Smit proclaimed that Trash Cabaret is like AfrikaBurn only they have grass and credit card facilities. Trash Cabaret is no AfrikaBurn, but that’s not a bad thing. Trash Cabaret is something AfrikaBurn could never be, inclusive. At R100 – R150 a ticket, Trash Cabaret is an affordable outing even in the middle of the month, and you don’t need a 4×4 to get to Hillcrest Quarry**.

While I might have moved up my inevitable deafness by 4 years, I didn’t feel too fazed. I also didn’t mind the speck burnt on my pleather jacket. It’s the price you pay when you stand right up against the speaker with sparks flying from St. Fox’s Mad Max grinder guitar while a selection of the most beautiful burlesque dancers twirl their tasselled nipple caps with dirty smiles. Dancers with my body shape, deemed ‘plus size’ by mainstream media, with the confidence that make Victoria Secret models look mousey.

This is a very shameful photo. Somehow we missed the memo about dressing up. Felt like a tourist.

This is a very shameful photo. Somehow we missed the memo about dressing up. Felt like a tourist.

People danced with careless abandonment during The Nomadic Orchestra’s set. The sound from the 5-piece orchestra bounced off the high walls of the quarry, swished around the countless top hats in the audience and swept me off my feet. I now fully understood the name of the name of their new album, Love. Dancing was the only option to keep from falling over.

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Like Trash Cabaret on Facebook for more photos and updates on furture events.

*Rumour has it that Riri signed up to Trash Cabaret but got caught up last minute with the business of retrieving her money from bitches.

Book review: Death by Carbs – Paige Nick

Death by Carbs

Death by Carbs

All books needs a goodie and badie (protagonist and antagonist if you will). For the best selling Real Meal Revolution it’s bacon vs carbs*. Death by Carbs is not as clear cut.

I came across Death by Carbs in the biography section of CNA. Paige Nick’s latest novel (yes CNA, a work of fiction) is set in a fictionalsised (sorry CNA, now I’m just being douchey) Cape Town where South Africa’s premier sport scientist, Tim Noakes,  has been murdered. Who-donut (now I have to apologize to Paige, she told the joke better)… I mean whodunit?

With jealous co authors, the worst hijackers ever and general pleps hoping to cash in on the banting craze there’s more than enough suspects. But don’t work too hard trying to figure it out,  the SAPS sure ain’t making the effort. And if you nodded in agreement to that South Africanism, casual pessimism about the police, you’d enjoy this novel dipping into the best and worst of South African culture.

Downsides: I would have liked to see more female characters. Misspelling Marian Keyes’ name**.

Is Death by Carbs a very thinly veiled brand extension of the Real Meal Revolution? Or is it a brilliant yet accessible critique on the fickle 24 hour news cycle and herd mentality of social media in South Africa? Possibly both, but it’s a good holiday read.

Above all Death By Carbs is a great icebreaker for that awkward dinner with the in-laws this Easter. “Fabulous cake Tannie Marge…. (crickets)… so how would you off Tim Noakes?”

* I think, couldn’t be bothered to read it.

** In the first draft of this review I spelt Noakes wrong multiple times. Thanks for pointing that out Paige!

Spier drive-in: The blog post with all the updates including this headline

Alternative headline for this post, “Spier just dropped the watermelon”. But let’s start from the beginning.

  • Or you can scroll through to the end of this post for 3 updates that were added through the week.

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I grew up in a time when drive-ins were slowly being phased out, but was already an overgrown field in my rundown plattelandse hometown. So this experience was high on my (sadly limited childhood) bucketlist.

Spier Wine Farm preys on this kind on nostalgia. Tickets for their drive-in screenings sell out weeks in advance. By hook and crook we got a ticket (it’s sold by car) to the Dirty Dancing screening on 27 February.

The organisation was bumpy from the beginning, the cars pilled up as only one person ticked off names from a list and explained how the evening worked. We weren’t on the list but were ‘allowed in’ because we had the ticket on us. Very decent of them. The ‘movie usher’ and security at the field were much friendlier. Spier claimed to arrange the cars according to size. You know, like a raised 4×4 in the row in front of a Mini Cooper.

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Retro date night – despite of the general negative tone of this post we had a lot of fun

Due to power failure/technical difficulties the film started about 15 minutes late. We were kept in the loop by the lady apologising over the radio and asking questions that couldn’t be answered by a hoot of a car horn.

Once the movie started rolling it was wonderful. As the sound comes from your car’s radio once tuned in a local frequency, it’s clear and as loud as you need it to be. It feels like you’re in a bubble. I didn’t hear a single person from the cars near us, there was just the occational flash of a selfie.

Then about three quarters into the movie the DVD skipped over a whole section. It happened so quick that those kissing in the backseat wouldn’t have noticed how one second Baby and Johnny were cuddling in a post coidal glow and the next she was at breakfast with the folks. Yet this was a forgivable fuck up compared to what happened next.

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One fool proof way to have a good time is to bring your own props

Just after the movie’s famous line (Nobody puts Baby in the corner!) the DVD started acting up again messing up the pivotal dance scene. The bubble burst, I could hear my neighbours clearly, loud boos and car horns were hurled across the field. In between empty apologies the scene was restored and the last few minutes played in the spirit it was made, in spite of management.

Radio lady blamed the glitches on the fact that they had to wait for dark therefore they couldn’t run a test (or some bs like that, no version of which makes sense). Is it not possible to do a dry run the night before, when it was also dark? But mostly, haven’t they done tons of movie nights which uses the same technology and general setup? You have a cashcow on your hands Spier, invest in equipment that works and people who know what they’re doing.

I’m filing this experience under a fun night with my Baby that I won’t recommend to anyone with high irritation levels and have a need to get value for their money. Rather support the professionals at the Galileo Theatre or watch a shaky bootleg on your tablet.

Note: Now and then I write random rants that I delete, why should I add more negativity to the internet? This post was doomed to that fate until I got this response from Spier’s Twitter account:

Spier

So instead of writing another account of the evening’s events that they won’t read, I thought I’ll just post it here where my mother stays up to date with my life.

UPDATE 1: The following Facebook post was in response to another complaint on Spier’s facebook group.

Short & Sweet Cape Town Hi Raighan, we are responsible for your experience last night. Short&Sweet pioneered the pop - up drive in and we host the drive-in at Spier. Last night we experienced a technical fault - which I'm sure u can imagine was my worst nightmare. I want nothing more than everything to run smoothly from beginning to end, but that doesn't always happen, and we need to roll with it. We had a good copy of the film, but it was a Dvd format, which is the worst format to screen from- but our options are limited legally. Please note SPIER are not responsible for the technical fault or the non-stop talking MC (me) - Short&Sweet take full responsibility - we are not an audio and visual company, we are a movement that aims to bring the magic of film to everyone by taking film out of the theatre and into the city bringing it to the people. I host free screenings at schools using the short film medium to educate, inspire and empower the youth - we also host pop-up cinema as fundraisers for schools across the country. The mission is to get cinema everywhere - screens = access to information for everyone! With regards to the price, I have struggled with customers saying R250 is too expensive for a ticket - It is not R250 per ticket - it is R250 per car. This makes it R62.50 per person with 4 people in a car, which is less than the cinema, but it includes all of the other magic. The pop-up cinema set up is a big job - my team of 7 work 12-14 hour shifts when we host the drive-in - The screen is extremely heavy and when the wind blows it is almost impossible to lift it onto the stage. But they rock it every time. That said I sincerely apologize that the magic I had hoped you would experience was not realized. I can only hope that this message helps you see who we are and that your support is playing a role in the bigger plan we are working on. Much love xjulia

Short & Sweet Cape Town: Hi Raighan, we are responsible for your experience last night. Short&Sweet pioneered the pop – up drive in and we host the drive-in at Spier. Last night we experienced a technical fault – which I’m sure u can imagine was my worst nightmare. I want nothing more than everything to run smoothly from beginning to end, but that doesn’t always happen, and we need to roll with it. We had a good copy of the film, but it was a Dvd format, which is the worst format to screen from- but our options are limited legally. Please note SPIER are not responsible for the technical fault or the non-stop talking MC (me) – Short&Sweet take full responsibility – we are not an audio and visual company, we are a movement that aims to bring the magic of film to everyone by taking film out of the theatre and into the city bringing it to the people. I host free screenings at schools using the short film medium to educate, inspire and empower the youth – we also host pop-up cinema as fundraisers for schools across the country. The mission is to get cinema everywhere – screens = access to information for everyone! With regards to the price, I have struggled with customers saying R250 is too expensive for a ticket – It is not R250 per ticket – it is R250 per car. This makes it R62.50 per person with 4 people in a car, which is less than the cinema, but it includes all of the other magic. The pop-up cinema set up is a big job – my team of 7 work 12-14 hour shifts when we host the drive-in – The screen is extremely heavy and when the wind blows it is almost impossible to lift it onto the stage. But they rock it every time. That said I sincerely apologize that the magic I had hoped you would experience was not realized. I can only hope that this message helps you see who we are and that your support is playing a role in the bigger plan we are working on. Much love xjulia

UPDATE 2: Spier has since taken ownership of this situation. I am open to being wrong about an establishment that makes wine (happy even) (early days) (this is the last bracket in this paragraph). They sent the following email to everyone who attended the event:

Spier takes ownership of the Dirty Dancing f*up

Spier takes ownership of the Dirty Dancing drive-in f*up

FINAL UPDATE: I have changed the headline of this post [Nobody (except Spier) puts Baby in the corner] which was a true reflection of our experience at the drive- in on Saturday, to something that sums up the experience since then. Spier stepped up. Customer service isn’t dead.

Festival of Fizz: When the Wine Route visits the Garden Route

This weekend we were those tourists who, despite being in a foreign country, only ate at McDonald’s. Naturally our equivalent was a little more fabulous, Capetonians attending a MCC festival in George.

Chilled bottles of MCC was available for immediate consumption. Credit: Fancourt Facebook page

Chilled bottles of MCC was available for immediate consumption. Credit: Fancourt Facebook page

The inaugural Festival of Fizz was hosted at the heavily gated Fancourt in George. Compared to the Franschhoek Cap Classique and Champagne Festival ‘The ‘Magic of Bubbles, it looked ridiculously tiny with only 16 odd farms. Though this number multiplied quite quickly as hardly anyone asked for a tasting coupon…

I didn’t plan on writing this post so didn’t take any notes of all the different MCCs we tasted. So this merely an oversimplified list of our festival of the festival: Steenberg, L’Ormarins, Genevieve, Tanzanite and Moreson.

In the spirit of trying something new we didn’t visit two farms that were already taking up real estate in our fridge back home, Graham Beck and our “local” De Grendel.

Once you got to the festival tent the organisation was smooth. There was one table to buy the all the MMCs represented and coupons used to purchase the food at the entrance/exit. Tables were placed under the trees for those wanting to enjoy gourmet snacks or a deeper sip of bubbly. Getting to the festival once in Fancout’s gates was a bit vague though. There would have been a better flow if there were dedicated shuttles waiting to transport to and from the parking lot, that or clear signs for those who don’t mind walking.

Saberage with a bottle of De Grendel MCC on our elopement day

Saberage with a bottle of De Grendel MCC on our elopement day in October.  Credit: Greg van der Reis

From previous visits to wine farms and other festivals we have learned quite a bit about the MCC process, so it was great to be schooled one of the lesser known joys of MCC, saberage. Saberage is the art of removing the top of a champagne bottle with a sword/knife, however it can also be done with a butter knife. The Plus One had a level of success with this over the years but hit a bit of a snag of late. The friendly guy from Moreson kindly shared a few pointers. He also pointed us the direction of Genevieve, a MCC he was sampling himself.

There was only one food stand which had exquisite looking bite sized treats. The spring roll was delicious making up for the average sushi plate. Dessert was juicy cream-filled strawberries.

A delicate spread

A delicate spread  Credit: Plus One

The Festival of Fizz was a fun diversion though I believe the tickets at R150 at pop, is quite steep for the value one gets. But even as I wrote the last sentence I knew we will most likely be back, champagne flute in hand, if we’re in the neighbourhood next year.

Dusty Rebels and the Bombshells: Sounds like a band, acts like a festival

You rarely leave a festival looking better than you did when you arrived, but then Dusty Rebels and the Bombshells isn’t your regular festival. Where in the world – and by world I mean Cape Town – would you find beautiful girls dressed to the nines with red lips, updos and flared dresses only to hang around a dirt track?

Photo credit: Carina Roux/TygerBurger

Photo credit: Carina Roux/TygerBurger

Dusty Rebels and the Bombshells is the quintessence of rockabilly, an alternative subculture that brings the 50s greaser culture into the 21st century. To completely oversimplify, it’s what Grease would have looked like if a Suicide Girl was cast as Sandy instead of Olivia Newton John and the backtracks were scrapped in favour of a swinging rock/blues band.  Dusty Rebels and the Bombshells

The first few stalls assisted in the cosmetic transformation of a regular Jill and Joe into a bombshells and dusty rebels. The queue stretched long for pinup girl hair styles such as the victory roll from the talented ladies at Scar. Next door natural makeup was wiped off in favour of cat eyes and full red lips by the Mac makeup artists. Local barber, Barnet Fair, set up shop on the back of a bakkie where patrons could keep smoking while getting their quiffs styled.Dusty Rebels and the Bombshells

Only in its second year the organisation at Dusty Rebels and the Bombshells already runs relatively smoothly with more than enough food stalls, clean toilets and entertainment to go around. The only element really lacking was a programme posted somewhere, even if it was just online.

The hub of excitement was at the dirt track where hotrods revved up into a mighty ball of dust and a few kookier vehicles (think hearse) trying to navigate their way through.

The Hot Rod Honeys bashing it out with The Swingin Kittens

The Hot Rod Honeys bashing it out with The Swingin Kittens

The sport(s) weren’t just limited to the petrol guzzlers. The Hot Rod Honeys and The Swingin Kittens made up of skaters for the Cape Town Rollergirls held a roller derby exhibition match that had many a jaw drop. These girls are the height of badassdom. Look them up on Facebook, they’re recruiting!

In the centre of it all was the music that only really got its due when the dirt track closed and other activities quieted down a bit. Martin Rocka and the Sick Shop (I kept hearing Sex Shop), was a flamboyant brash of rock n roll. In fact with his Mexican Lucha Libre wrestling mask and red silk robe the lead singer looked like he would be very comfortable in a seedy sex shop. Their music has an honest, if a little obnoxious, quality that only a self-confessed tw*t can produce. As this is a family friendly website I will leave it at that…

An awesome Hiss Happ creation

An awesome Hiss Happ creation

If there was ever a subculture in need of a festival it is rockabilly. A lifestyle for some, a colourful break from reality for others, start practising those victory rolls gals, the Dusty Rebels and the Bombshells will rock again.

Click here for more images by the TygerBuger.

Silwerskermfees 2014: Fear of missing out in Cape Town

The Kyknet Silwerskermfees is a celebration of South African Cinema, with 10 full length premiers, 23 existing full-length and short films, 11 documentaries, 15 short films produced and commissioned by the kykNET and 8 panel discussions spread over 4 days. Though predominantly Afrikaans this year’s line-up includes films in English, isiXhosa and Zulu.

Last year I only attended one day of the Silwerskermfees and just went with the flow. The joy of spontaneously watching a few amazing films was only eclipsed by the fear of missing out on a hand full of gems that showed earlier that week. So this time around I watched a few trailers and asked around to work out a program for maximum awesomeness.

Here’s three I’m most excited to see:

Almon, Henry


Stom

 Die Spook Van Uniondale

Date: 27-30 Augustus 2014
Venue: The Bay Hotel, Camps Bay
Tickets: R150/day or R500 for the full 4 day festival

The film festival on the banks of the Boere Riviera

Outside, Cape Town was having one of her casual apocalyptic storms while inside the Bay Hotel I was on my best behaviour. It is the strangest thing; I have spotted tons of my parents’ friends milling around already. After a while I realised that the beautiful lady drinking coffee at the table next to ours was in fact the actress Jana Cilliers and not my mother’s bestie.  All the other ‘friends’ were also a miscellany of the actors who graced our Saturday night small screen.

JanaCilliers

The event was KykNet’s Silwerskermfees that showcased a selection of Afrikaans short and feature films. We only went for the one day and oh how I wished I had Hermione’s time turner. Hard decisions had to be made. Offer

We really enjoyed Harald Richter’s short film Offer which was based on O Henry story, ‘The Gifts of Magi’. Because smudged mascara is a good way to start off a 10 hour day.

Prinses

Prinses turned me into a horror fan for 30 minutes and is the reason why I won’t ever look a ballerina in the eye again. A certain soap star who sat next to me (okay, it was Brumilda van Rensburg) said with wide eyes, “Ek het nou ‘n Bakgat of iets nodig.” With so many of the newbie film makers loitering about one had to be very careful when giving an  opinion, unless you really stood by it. After watching Ompad someone next to me loudly trashed the student rampage short film with the whole cast sitting drinking coffee a few meters away. She just shrugged when this was pointed out to her.

I regret missing the screenings of Toevlug, Beskermhere and the Boer War zombie film Bloedson with their panel discussions earlier in the week. We were only there for the Friday. Luckily the short films will be available online. Anyone with uncapped internet free this weekend?

* Read my full report of the Silwerskermfees on Howzit MSN.

Elle Editor’s Breakfast

Style talk with Elle’s Belles with a side of crispy bacon, what’s not to love? The event was the Elle Editor’s Breakfast and entrance was a clever comment on their website.

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The way we consume magazines has changed drastically. Even those who still kick it old school with a copy bought from a supermarket don’t leave it at that. It’s all about added value on Twitter, Facebook, blogs, Instagram and Pinterest. Elle takes this even further with events outside the digital realm like the Editor’s Breakfast.

At the Elle Editor’s Breakfast, hosted in the 3 major cities, readers have the opportunity to share their thoughts with the Elle team. Editor, Jackie Burger, broke the ice by having everyone introduce themselves and share what it means to be a woman in honour of Women’s Day. I am horrible with public speaking so what I said is a complete black hole in my memory. One of the Elizabeth Arden consultants stuck with me: “It’s the birth right of every woman to be beautiful.”

I felt confident putting my beauty routine in the hands of someone with this sentiment. Everyone received a skin consultation from Elizabeth Arden and products tailored to each individual’s needs. As part of the assessment they viewed my skin under a UV light. It felt extremely futuristic inside the light box with the beauty consultant’s huge eyes looking at me from the other side. It was absolutely terrifying to see my skin under the light with my freckles so prominent I could individually name them. My ‘bravery’ was rewarded with a toner, cleanser and ceramide capsules in Elizabeth Arden’s gold packaging. To paraphrase Jackie, they don’t do sample sizes.

ElizabethArden

Meeting Jackie reminded me of the day I met Nataniël, approachable but still more fabulous than anyone in the room. I complimented her on her stockings/shoe combination, “They’re from Woolies she said, “The stockings?!” me,” No, they’re from Paris.” She also shared the secret to her signature red lips (primer).

The morning was conducted in a casual manner. Jackie and the rest of the Elle staff answered some of the questions that were posted online by standing up where they were seated. This made the event feel very intimate. Readers also had the chance to ask questions or simply to add their opinion to the conversation.

The only damper on the event was the news that former Elle Rising Star winner Tiaan Nagel had closed up shop and will be a fashion director for the Sunday Times. A project on Tiaan scored me an 80% in varsity so I’ve always had a soft spot for him. In the press release he said: “Lately I have found it extremely difficult to keep on producing contemporary designer clothing in quality fabrics that is distinctively minimal in its design approach, but commercially viable in a relatively young and less discerning market. For now I have made my decision to rather walk away from an industry that I respect and love; I don’t know how to contribute to it anymore.”

15onOrange

The breakfast served up by 15 on Orange was Instagram bait, way too beautiful to eat.  I tried to fit into the elegant surroundings by passing around a plate of fresh salmon before eating it all but this was a bit of a fail when it ended up right in front of me again.

Thank you to Elle and Elizabeth Arden for the amazing spoil, my boss who gave me the morning off and the lovely ladies at my table (Alisson, Jane, Zaida and Tara).

Chatting scarves with Nataniël

On Friday I had the pleasure  of hanging out on the set of Die Nataniël Tafel. Nataniël is a really really big deal in certain factions of the Afrikaans community, mostly mothers and more specifically my mom. When I posted a pic of the set on Facebook I realised that his popularity had trickled down to the younger generation when a friend got so excited that she didn’t even bother to post a comment and just messaged me directly instead. Later, my youngest sister bitterly wanted all the details.

My money shot pic with Nataniël. Co producer Adelaide Potgieter and former 7de waiter turned production assistant  Sekoati Tsubane are in the background

My money shot pic with Nataniël. Co producer Adelaide Potgieter and former 7de waiter turned production assistant Sekoati Tsubane are in the background

As much as I enjoy fostering jealously amongst family and friends, there was more to this experience than that. I am also a bit of a fan girl. In my youth I looked forward to his columns in my mom’s Sarie every month.

While they were still prepping for the show Nataniël found a cellphone charging on the set. He asked who was so middle class to record with a cellphone. And there I was with my S3 taking photos of it all, with a deep blush creeping over my face even though the jab was not directed at me. Having a sense of humour is mandatory if you’re in Nataniël’s presence.

Later in the production room I got to meet the man. He complimented my polka dot scarf – he wore a similar one the previous day. Star stuck I blurted out the first thing that came to mind, “Thanks, it’s a Chinatown special.” He went on to tell a story that completely muddled up everything I thought I knew about him. His friend often goes to the Chinatown in Johannesburg where one needs to buy 5 scarves at a time which she then distributes amongst their circle. So before they go out together they’ll call ahead to coordinate who is wearing their scarf.

Read the full story and check the gallery on MSN Howzit.